Thursday, 16 November 2017

some crypto currency news and readings

Apologies for the link farm type of article, this is mostly to share with people interested with latest interesting stuff.


Academic certificates in blockchain:

http://www.newsbtc.com/2017/10/03/maltese-government-taps-blockchain-publish-academic-certificates/

Property:

https://cointelegraph.com/news/swiss-crypto-valley-pens-legal-framework-for-blockchain-crypto-property

Programming contracts in Ether:

https://solidity.readthedocs.io/en/latest/

Hedging cryptos:

http://www.newsbtc.com/2017/10/08/hedge-projects-ccx30-cryptocurrency-indices-reuters/

Mastercard supports blockchain:

https://futurism.com/mastercard-announces-that-payments-can-now-be-made-on-blockchain/

Accessibility:

https://news.bitcoin.com/bitcoin-accessibility-from-a-blind-persons-perspective/

Scams:

https://mybroadband.co.za/news/security/234618-beware-of-these-common-cryptocurrency-scams.html

Why bitcoin stopped responding last weekend:

https://cointelegraph.com/news/how-close-did-bitcoin-get-to-disastrous-chain-death-spiral

Amex supports XRP:

https://cointelegraph.com/news/amex-partners-with-ripple-for-blockchain-payments

More scams, mostly because of last weekend:

https://cointelegraph.com/news/buyer-beware-cryptocurrency-pump-and-dump-schemes-coordinated-in-telegram

POS software:

https://cointelegraph.com/news/16-bln-payments-app-square-integrates-bitcoin-whats-next

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/square-point-of-sale-pos/id335393788?mt=8

Tuesday, 7 November 2017

Correct English

Introduction

Please note this page contains the author's opinions only and may differ from the Rules and Regulations of the University. Please consult the University Rules, which overrule these.

Nice page: http://www.vox.com/2015/3/3/8053521/25-maps-that-explain-english

On this page I list common errors people make in their usage of English, and provide the corrections. You'll notice that I can't make up my mind whether English is capitalised or not. I have the same problem with "earth." Anyone want to correct me?

PS If you don't think learning to spell is important, please consider the below:

Punctuation

Apostrophe, possessive and plural forms. This is used to indicate a missing letter which was historically present. Hence, the word "don't" contains an apostrophe because it is a contraction of "do not." the apostrophe replaces the O. Other examples are "let's", which is short for "let us", and "he's", which is short for "he has" or "he is". E.g., "He's got a car" means "he has got a car". Similarly, in the past, i.e., about 1000 years ago, English used -as for plural and -es for possessive (genitive). Since the loss of the vowel in these suffixes, we now use the apostrophe to denote the E in -es (genitive). e.g., John's apple's red colour—meaning, the red colour of the apple of John. If John has more than one apple, it would be apples (without an apostrophe) to indicate the presence of more than one apple, however, if we still want to talk about the red colour of John's apples, we have to add an apostrophe to indicate that we're not putting the -es of possessive form, but we know it should be there. So it would be: John's apples' red colour. American usage retains the second S, i.e., John's apples's red colour.


Why you should hodl (hold) before a fork

The trouble with buying additional bitcoin just before a fork is that the price inflations will counteract the value of the new coin.

 

Look at the previous case. BCH (bitcoin cash) came out as about $300-400 after the first fork in July. That was about 10% the value of the btc.

 

So if you panic-buy before a fork, you should not buy more than 10% of what you hold.

 

For example if you buy 0.1 btc now, it will cost R 10 000, or about $ 700. But after the fork, the value might collapse all the way back to $4500 or so. Meaning you lose about R 5500 / $ 400 value.

 

However, assuming 0.1 of the new coin is worth 0.1 of $ 300, you’ll make $30 from the new coins. $30 doesn’t compensate for the post-fork losses of R 5500 / $400.

 

In other words, when a fork comes up, hold or sell. (You can buy back when the market hysteria dies down at a lower cost).

Here’s an example of a fast buy/sell cycle.

Suppose you buy 1 BTC at $ 4000 at time X

Suppose a fork comes up and the price of 1 BTC goes to $ 7000 (like it just did), at time Y, just before the fork

The value increase is $ 3000.

Now, if you sell 1 BTC, you gain $ 3000 on your initial investment of 1 BTC.

Suppose after the fork, the price crashes down to $ 5000 - not as low as you originally bought at, but lower than the pre-fork hysteria price of $ 7000.

You wait for the crash to finish and the price to stabilise, and buy back at $ 5000.

You still have $ 2000 in the bank that you can keep or use to buy additional BTC.

If you decide to take your $ 2000 profit into BTC, you can get 0.4 BTC.

That means by selling just before a fork, you can come out at 1.4 BTC instead of 1 BTC with no actual material losses.

At the next fork, your 1.4 BTC won’t be a mere $ 7000, assuming the hysteria carries 1 BTC to $ 7000 again. Your 1.4 BTC will then be $ 9800.

Sell just before the fork, wait for the post-fork crash, and buy back at a lower price.

Rinse and repeat.

 

List of useful mac apps

This is mostly a note to self so that I can share with others when they ask which apps I recommend. Android File Transfer.app (*) get file...